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Buck Hollow (VA)

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I wish I had spent as much time studying my textbooks as I have studying David Hart’s exceptional book — Flyfisher’s Guide to Virginia. I was looking for additional disclosed brookie water to investigate on the east slope of the Blue Ridge and stumbled across a reference to Bucks Hollow. It’s an offshoot of the Thornton river just west of Sperryville. After an unsuccessful attempt to find the Piney (tricky access – I know where it is now), Lon and I decided to make a detour over and see what Bucks had to offer. After struggling a bit to find the parking area, we rigged up and walked up the wide trail that led directly to the Thornton River and, a few yards later, intersected Bucks Hollow.

There wasn’t much to look at at the confluence with the Thornton, so we continued up the improved trail to see what would develop. On many small streams, you don’t really know what will happen farther up — there may be plenty of plunge pools and other structure that mitigates the lack of volume. The trail crosses the creek intermittently and did not look good at the crossings. We began to scratch our heads as we wondered whether it would be worth fishing. As you can see from the pictures, it is very skinny water.

At most, the stream bed is 5 feet across, uniformly shallow without significant pooling.  Concerned that we had missed good spots by staying on the trail, we walked up the stream bed to see what would happen. Short answer. Nothing. Failing to see anything interesting, we jumped back on the trail to move a good distance farther up to see if the character of the stream changed with a gain in elevation. Sadly, it did not. After walking in for 3/4 mile, we looked at each other and realized that this was a fools errand. Since we were here to fish, not hike, we beat feet back to the truck to move to a better location.

Bottom Line: This place is not worth the trip. I’m sure there are trout here, but I doubt there is anything larger than a few inches. There may be larger pools farther upstream, but we decided it wasn’t worth the energy to try and discover them.

Getting There: Head west from Sperryville on US 211.  Approximately 0.6 miles after crossing into the Park, you will see a turnoff on the left side of the road.  Be alert or you will miss it.  Park there and follow the trail to the river.

Google Local Coordinates: 38.65831, -78.28199

Secrets Revealed?  No.  This is a very public location that is documented in the following places:

Virginia VDGIF
Flyfisher’s Guide to Virginia 

Tell a friend about this article by clicking on this link 

Date Fished: 5/28/2010

Typical pool – very shallow

Narrow streambed

Downstream from where we turned

Looking upstream from where we turned around

Unless stated otherwise, this article was authored by Steve Moore

Disclaimer and Warning:  The contents of this site reflect the opinion of the author and you, the reader, must exercise care in the use and interpretation of this information.  Fishing is a dangerous sport.  You can slip and fall on rocks and sustain severe injury.  You can drown.  You can get hooks caught in your skin, face, eyes or other sensitive places.  All sorts of bad things can happen to you when to go into the woods to visit the places documented here.  Forests, streams and lakes are wild areas and any number of bad things can happen.  You must make your own judgment in terms of acceptable behavior and risk and not rely on anything posted here.  I disclaim all liability and responsibility for any actions you take as a result of reading the articles on this site.  If you do not agree with this, you should not read anything posted on this site.

Disclaimer and Warning:  The contents of this site reflect the opinion of the author and you, the reader, must exercise care in the use and interpretation of this information.  Fishing is a dangerous sport.  You can slip and fall on rocks and sustain severe injury.  You can drown.  You can get hooks caught in your skin, face, eyes or other sensitive places.  All sorts of bad things can happen to you when to go into the woods to visit the places documented here.  Forests, streams and lakes are wild areas and any number of bad things can happen.  You must make your own judgment in terms of acceptable behavior and risk and not rely on anything posted here.  I disclaim all liability and responsibility for any actions you take as a result of reading the articles on this site.  If you do not agree with this, you should not read anything posted on this site.

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