Trout Hike – Great Seneca Creek Trout Fishing (MD – Riffle Ford Downstream)

Over the next couple of months, I will bang out the rest of the trip reports associated with Great Seneca Creek. This body of water is only good immediately after stocking. In contrast, the water is still cold enough to hold trout—it turns into a bathtub by the time July rolls around, with the only thing moving being the bluegills.

As I mentioned in other posts, Great Seneca Creek has good access points along its 16-mile stretch.  However, according to the Park Rangers I spoke with, there are only two places that receive routine stockings.  These are Black Rock and Riffle Ford.  With that in mind, I went to the Riffle Ford access point full of optimism. Immediately after starting downstream, it was clear to me that this creek would not be anything special.  It has that characteristic central Maryland look and feel to it – which means it’s generally low water, marginal scenery, and heavy pressure from the look of the boot prints pressed into the mud. 

Following my normal approach, I walked downstream about three-quarters of a mile to get a look at the water and to position myself to fish upstream. On the way downstream, I noted that the walking was easy, with a fairly low brush and a marginal trail paralleling the creek.  There are plenty of twists and turns to the creek, and, as usual, every bend held a deeper pocket of water that would be a likely lurking place for fish.  But here’s the rub: how far down would this have been stocked?  It’s easy to make that call up where the road crosses the creek, but down here in the middle of the woods, was it likely that any trout had penetrated this far downstream?  I certainly did not see any tire tracks that could have been associated with a stocking vehicle. 

As it turns out, based on my luck that day, the answer was no.  I did not encounter any signs of trout until I got within 100 yards of the Riffle Ford access point.  So, this trip became a good casting practice session as I shook off the winter cobwebs and sharpened my technique for future trips.  The creek is generally wide, offering good angles for casting.  The trees are kind here, and I did not leave flies hanging from their branches.  But make no mistake about it, the pressure here is intense.  In addition to the subtle signs of human activity like the boot tracks, the obvious ones were pulling up in cars at the access point and piling out.  All were ready and eager (like me) to go after the stockers that had been dumped into this water over the previous two weeks.

Great Seneca Creek Trout Fishing Bottom Line:  Only good during the spring when the water is stocked.  Stick closer to the places where the DNR could get to the water to load the fish – I’m not sure you gain anything by walking as far downstream as I did – stick close to the road.

Getting There:  In Gaithersburg, MD, go south on Quince Orchard Road (Rt 124).  Turn right on Rt 28 and then right onto Riffle Ford Road.  Follow it to the creek.  There is plenty of parking at this access point.

Looking up to the Riffle Ford bridge which is the access point.

It’s a shame that great structure like this goes to the bluegills

The scene at the place where I turned around

Bends and curves in the creek like this one all have deeper spots.

Unless stated otherwise, this article was authored by Steve Moore

Articles on this site are out of date since some go back to 2006. Regulations and property ownership may have changed since publication. It is your responsibility to know and obey all regulations and not trespass on private property.

Disclaimer and Warning:  The contents of this site reflect the opinion of the author and you, the reader, must exercise care in the use and interpretation of this information.  Fishing is a dangerous sport.  You can slip and fall on rocks and sustain severe injury.  You can drown.  You can get hooks caught in your skin, face, eyes or other sensitive places.  All sorts of bad things can happen to you when to go into the woods to visit the places documented here.  Forests, streams and lakes are wild areas and any number of bad things can happen.  You must make your own judgment in terms of acceptable behavior and risk and not rely on anything posted here.  I disclaim all liability and responsibility for any actions you take as a result of reading the articles on this site.  If you do not agree with this, you should not read anything posted on this site.

Disclaimer and Warning:  The contents of this site reflect the opinion of the author and you, the reader, must exercise care in the use and interpretation of this information.  Fishing is a dangerous sport.  You can slip and fall on rocks and sustain severe injury.  You can drown.  You can get hooks caught in your skin, face, eyes or other sensitive places.  All sorts of bad things can happen to you when to go into the woods to visit the places documented here.  Forests, streams and lakes are wild areas and any number of bad things can happen.  You must make your own judgment in terms of acceptable behavior and risk and not rely on anything posted here.  I disclaim all liability and responsibility for any actions you take as a result of reading the articles on this site.  If you do not agree with this, you should not read anything posted on this site.

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