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Morgan Run Overview

Articles on this site are out of date since some go back to 2006. Regulations and property ownership may have changed since publication. It is your responsibility to know and obey all regulations and not trespass on private property.

Overview

The special regulation area is a little over 3 miles long and extends from London Bridge Road in the south to Route 97 in the north. At the northern end, it starts out as an narrow, shallow run cradled by high dirt banks, speckled with logjams, and is lucky to be 20 feet wide. By the time it courses under London Bridge Road, not only does the physical structure change to large boulders framing a cobble bottom hemmed in by steep hills, but it expands 40 feet wide. Over the years, the tree canopy closed in over the stream; leaving a 20 foot crack to the sky that serves to keep the water cool and the fishing good.  The Maryland DNR stocks Morgan Run heavily and there is limited brown trout holdover when the summers stay under control and do not become blazingly hot.

There are three primary access points stream: Klee Mill, Jim Bowers and London Bridge.

Starting in the south at London Bridge, there is a limited amount of parking on the shoulder of the road to the south of the bridge with the faint trail starting along the north side. This is also where the stream is deepest and you should wear chest waders to cross the stream without restriction, following the dim trail as it jumps from one side to the other before it eventually fades into the underbrush. Klee Mill, in the middle, has a formal parking area with a disabled angler platform and ramp near the parking lot. There is a well defined path moving downstream from the parking area for a significant distance.  The parking at Jim Bowers Road is small and rests at the end of the dirt road leading into it. Follow the obvious path further south to reach the river. There is no path on the northern side, but once you wade across the stream there is an easy walking trail set back 25 yards from the stream.

It is amazing how the scenery changes from south to north. In the south, the stream gains velocity as it runs through a narrow gash between the surrounding hills. This causes the water to carve out its bed and push the sand downstream. Although the banks are forested and you know you are in central Maryland, there are enough rocks to give this a true “trout water” feel that continues through Klee Mill.  A half mile above Klee Mill, the stream breaks out into traditional wide, flat farmland where it loses velocity and the sand returns. The banks remain heavily forested all the way up to the end of the special regulation section at Route 97.

There is no need to use anything heavier than a 4wt rod.  While we recommend chest waders in the southern section, hippers are adequate if you fish at Jim Bowers Road.

Directions

From I-70, take exit 76 north on MD-97 towards Westminster/Olney. Follow, MD-97 47.3 miles and turn right on Bartholomew road. 0.8 miles later turn left on Klee Mill Road. Continue on Klee Mill for 1.7 miles until you cross a stream. The formal parking area is on the left.


To go to the London Bridge access point, turn right on Cherry Tree Lane from Klee Mill Road. Follow Cherry Tree Lane for 1.5 miles and make the left turn on the London Bridge Road. The stream is 0.7 miles from the turn.

To visit the Jim Bowers Road access point, continue on MD-97 and turn right on E. Nicodemus road (11.8 miles from I-70). Follow Nicodemus for 0.9 miles and turn right on Jim Bowers Road. Follow it to the end.

Regulations

Catch and Return Trout Fishing Areas – Limited to Use of Artificial Lures Only

·         A person may not have any trout in possession while fishing in these areas. All trout which are caught shall be released and returned to the water.

·         A person may fish only with artificial lures, including artificial flies.

·         The use or possession of any natural bait, bait fish, fish bait, scents, or any other devices capable of catching fish other than artificial lures and artificial flies (see definition on page 13) is prohibited.

·         The open season is Jan. 1 through Dec. 31, inclusive.

Tips

The best time to fish is in the spring.

Unless stated otherwise, this article was authored by Steve Moore

Disclaimer and Warning:  The contents of this site reflect the opinion of the author and you, the reader, must exercise care in the use and interpretation of this information.  Fishing is a dangerous sport.  You can slip and fall on rocks and sustain severe injury.  You can drown.  You can get hooks caught in your skin, face, eyes or other sensitive places.  All sorts of bad things can happen to you when to go into the woods to visit the places documented here.  Forests, streams and lakes are wild areas and any number of bad things can happen.  You must make your own judgment in terms of acceptable behavior and risk and not rely on anything posted here.  I disclaim all liability and responsibility for any actions you take as a result of reading the articles on this site.  If you do not agree with this, you should not read anything posted on this site.

Disclaimer and Warning:  The contents of this site reflect the opinion of the author and you, the reader, must exercise care in the use and interpretation of this information.  Fishing is a dangerous sport.  You can slip and fall on rocks and sustain severe injury.  You can drown.  You can get hooks caught in your skin, face, eyes or other sensitive places.  All sorts of bad things can happen to you when to go into the woods to visit the places documented here.  Forests, streams and lakes are wild areas and any number of bad things can happen.  You must make your own judgment in terms of acceptable behavior and risk and not rely on anything posted here.  I disclaim all liability and responsibility for any actions you take as a result of reading the articles on this site.  If you do not agree with this, you should not read anything posted on this site.

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