Trout – Beetree Run (MD)

Articles on this site are out of date since some go back to 2006. Regulations and property ownership may have changed since publication. It is your responsibility to know and obey all regulations and not trespass on private property.

Approximate Boundary: 39.677301,-76.666896 to 39.694177,-76.668699 (1.6 miles)

The 263 acre Beetree Preserve hosts Beetree Run, a small native trout stream. The Towson Presbyterian Church manages the preserve and establishes the rules for access. According to their literature, “The preserve is generally open to all responsible individuals and groups during daylight hours. However, large groups should reserve times with the church prior to use. Written authorization is required for all evening and overnight use.” Assuming you are responsible and not a large group, you can fish here without further coordination.

 If you plug the above GPS coordinates into a Garmin vehicular GPS system, the voice may insist you make a right turn onto Bee Tree Road once you pass the large kiosk on the left at the intersection of Kaufmann and Bee Tree. Ignore the course correction and continue straight through the intersection, crossing a small bridge prior to arriving at the second bridge adjacent to the Torrey C Brown Rail (TCB) Trail.

The tiny stream parallels the TCB trail for most of its length and that is now many calculate the fishable length as being over five miles, especially since the trail runs all the way up to the Pennsylvania border. However, given the vagaries of private property, the only place you are guaranteed access is in the Beetree Preserve. While you can certainly fish outside the preserve, you must ensure that you are not trespassing. Use a bike or hike along the trail to find the best places to access the water.

The fishable property lies in the preserve to the east of the trail. Approximately 600 feet to the north of Beetree Road, the stream runs onto private property only to swerve back to the east into the preserve 500 feet later. From the bridge, the preserve extends approximately 0.8 miles south to end just north of Bentley Road and runs almost a mile to the north, giving anglers plenty of skinny water to follow in pursuit of that isolated pool full of wary brown trout. Be prepared to walk or bike to find the best places to fish. Since the TCB trail does not run directly adjacent to the stream, you will have to leave that level surface and bushwhack over to the water.

The stream bottom is a mix of rocks and sand with plenty of deeply undercut banks providing holding locations for the wild population of small brown trout that happily inhabit this water. The banks run three to four feet high and slope gradually to the stream. Tall grass grows to the water’s edge, making this an ideal location to flip terrestrial flies. Look for deep pools at the bends. Trees throw shade on the water, but they are not thick enough to present an obstacle to casting as long as you wade. Likewise, walk along the stream to find the best places to fish since the best spots are not visible from the trail. Since the wild trout are skittish, exercise stealth or resign yourself to sweating without a payoff.

Getting There: From I-83, take exit 33 onto MD 45, York Road. Turn left on Kaufman Road and follow it to the BeeTree Preserve.

 Access Point:

Turnout on Bee Tree Road (39.684346,-76.666329)

TCB Trail parking on Bentley Road (39.675022,-76.670421)

Secrets Revealed?  No.  This is a very public location that is documented in in the Potomac-Patuxent Maryland Guide

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Unless stated otherwise, this article was authored by Steve Moore

Disclaimer and Warning:  The contents of this site reflect the opinion of the author and you, the reader, must exercise care in the use and interpretation of this information.  Fishing is a dangerous sport.  You can slip and fall on rocks and sustain severe injury.  You can drown.  You can get hooks caught in your skin, face, eyes or other sensitive places.  All sorts of bad things can happen to you when to go into the woods to visit the places documented here.  Forests, streams and lakes are wild areas and any number of bad things can happen.  You must make your own judgment in terms of acceptable behavior and risk and not rely on anything posted here.  I disclaim all liability and responsibility for any actions you take as a result of reading the articles on this site.  If you do not agree with this, you should not read anything posted on this site.

Disclaimer and Warning:  The contents of this site reflect the opinion of the author and you, the reader, must exercise care in the use and interpretation of this information.  Fishing is a dangerous sport.  You can slip and fall on rocks and sustain severe injury.  You can drown.  You can get hooks caught in your skin, face, eyes or other sensitive places.  All sorts of bad things can happen to you when to go into the woods to visit the places documented here.  Forests, streams and lakes are wild areas and any number of bad things can happen.  You must make your own judgment in terms of acceptable behavior and risk and not rely on anything posted here.  I disclaim all liability and responsibility for any actions you take as a result of reading the articles on this site.  If you do not agree with this, you should not read anything posted on this site.

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