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The Year of the Snake(head)

My curiosity has overcome me. As I try and plan my fishing future for the rest of the year, I realize that there are a few new places for me to go within a reasonable driving distance of Northern Virginia. While my book writing this year will focus on the South Fork of the Shenandoah, I need diversions closer to home.

I think I am starting to catch some of the snakehead fever. After hearing a few talks and seeing pictures of massive fish alleged to be better tasting than even a walleye, I think I have to take a shot. Beyond that, some of the best alleged snakehead fishing is within a very short drive of where I live. Couple that with the fact that I can pop the Basswife in the front of the canoe and keep her happy, this seems like a no-brainer.

If anyone out there has advice on where to go and how to catch these creatures, please shoot me an e-mail at steve.moore@catchguide.com.

Here's what I know so far based on the limited amount of information I can find on the Internet:

  • Snakeheads like flat water near grass beds over a muddy bottom
  • Snakeheads hit top water lures like frogs and buzz baits as well as spinners
  • Snakeheads are hard to catch since they are alert and wary - stealth is important
  • Some places near me for Snakehead fishing include Pohick Bay, Neabsco Creek, Powells Creek (Leesylvania State Park), Quantico Creek, Chopawamsic Creek, and Aquia.

It will be interesting to see how this works out. One of the issues I have is that I will not take my canoe out on "big water." I need to stay close to the shore in the bays and the creeks and I know that probably limits the opportunities to catch these beasts.

Anyway, hopefully I can start to build an inventory of knowledge on how to catch these guys and do my small bit in the broader effort to limit their population growth.

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Unless stated otherwise, this article was authored by Steve Moore

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